We All Live Downstream

SEEK Updated
10/12/2015
Resource Types: 
Video
Abstract: 

The greatest threat to America's drinking water supplies--nonpoint
source pollution--is documented in a half-hour educational video
recently released by the Oregon State University Extension Service.

"We All Live Downstream" examines urban and rural runoff and the
problems it creates for surface and groundwater.

Nonpoint source pollution is carried by rain, snowmelt and
irrigation that moves across the landscape. It flows from a variety
of sources including farms, forests, city streets, construction
sites, mines and septic systems. Experts say America's growing
population has made urban and rural runoff the most serious threat
to our nation's drinking water supplies.

"We All Live Downstream" was videotaped primarily in Oregon's
Tualatin River basin, but Ron Miner, OSU Extension Water Quality
Specialist, says the program has implications for most every
watershed in the country.

"The video's message is easy to understand and should interest
anyone who is concerned about healthy watersheds and clean water
supplies," said Miner. "It explores how Oregon residents and
government officials are trying to reduce nonpoint source pollution,
and offers a variety of tips that can help Americans protect their
drinking water sources."

Author: 
Oregon State University Extension Service
Topic Areas: 
Pollution
Water
Rivers
Land
Target Audience: 
Adult
Producer / Landowner
Citizen and Youth Groups
All
Geographic Location: 
All Minnesota
Fee: 
Yes
Cost: 
$30.00
Library loan: 
No
Is training required?: 
No
Seasonal: 
No
Contact(s) or order information.: 

Publications Orders, EESC, Oregon State University, 422 Kerr
Administrative Services Building, Corvallis, OR 97331-21